North Birmingham Academy

North
Birmingham
Academy

Phone icon0121 373 1647

Ethos and values

At North Birmingham Academy we are committed to the highest standards in everything we do.   All our students should leave the academy as articulate, aspirational individuals equipped for the modern world and able to make a positive contribution to their community.

We are committed to supporting British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, respect and tolerance.

We are proud of our diverse community of students, staff and we are committed to creating an environment where individuals flourish and are treated with dignity and respect.

Our community represents over 60 minority ethnic groups with over 50 different home languages. A high proportion of our students (60%) come from disadvantaged backgrounds.

We are committed to equality and diversity and aim to ensure that:

  • Fairness and inclusion are fundamental to everything we do.
  • Diversity is valued and celebrated.
  • Good relationships between diverse groups are promoted.
  • Respect is at the heart of academy life.
  • All young people benefit from exceptional education opportunities.
  • All students and staff have an equal opportunity to achieve their potential.
  • Benefits to the local community we serve are maximised.

 

sAFEGUARDING

We are committed to keeping our students safe, both in school and the wider community.  As part of our safeguarding arrangements, we have two-way information sharing in place with West Midlands Police.  The agreement is compliant with Crime and Disorder Act 1988 (s.115) and Data Protection Act 1998 (s.29.3:s.35.2.), and focuses on preventing young people from becoming involved in crime and anti-social behaviour as a victim or offender.

Whilst we are a sponsored academy we work very closely with Birmingham City Council on matters of Safeguarding, our contact is Jon Needham, Schools Safeguarding Advisor 0121 675 2449.

Keeping Children Safe in Education is new statutory guidance and replaced the government’s previous safeguarding guidance.  It was updated in May 2016 (guidance commenced 5 September 2016).  The guidance applies to all schools and colleges.  It covers safeguarding information for all staff and how schools should manage safeguarding as well as important things such as safer recruitment of staff.  It explains that everyone who comes into contact with children and their families has a role to play in safeguarding children.  It also includes guidance on what to do if you are worried a child is being abused.

Parents/carers interested in the guidance can find it here https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/550511/Keeping_children_safe_in_education.pdf

Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL)  This is the senior member of staff with responsibility for safeguarding in the organisation who reports to the Headteacher. The designated safeguarding lead at North Birmingham Academy is Andrew Stratford.  The role of the DSL is to oversee and manage referrals.  This includes referring all cases of child abuse to the Local Authority Children’s Social Care and Health.  His role is to work with the Headteacher and inform him of issues including ongoing enquiries.  Our DSL is very well supported by our Academy Nurse, who has an important role in safeguarding. Our school liaison Police Officer, PC Bird gives us significant support and advice, he supports the Sharp System, which is an anonymous system for reporting concerns.

Practical safeguarding advice for parents and carers there may be times, as a parent or carer, when you need advice, help advice or information when caring for your child.  In addition to your child’s form tutor or head of year, key staff that can help you are Andrew Stratford and Philip Lloyd Designated Safeguarding Leads, PC Bird, Academy Liaison Police Officer.

Online Safety the NSPCC recently released a campaign aimed at parents of children between 8-12 to give them the information and confidence they need to have a conversation about safe-sharing online.  The evidence shows that from thee age’s onwards, children begin to use more devices to access the internet as well as being more active and independent online.  The goal of the campaign is to help any parents feeling they need support to get to grips with their child’s online activities.

The NSPCC worked with parents to establish their concerns – a panel of more than 500 parents from Mumsnet and 1850 young people assessed and tested a number of websites on criteria such as their reporting mechanisms, privacy settings and prevalence of inappropriate content.